• Lata Hamilton

Netflix's "Maid": The weirdest scene?!

**Spoiler alert: if you've not watched the series yet, read on at your own choice or scroll to the bottom.**


Netflix building. Image by Cameron Venti - Unsplash
Image by Cameron Venti - Unsplash

Part-drama, part-documentary, Netflix's latest limited series "Maid" shines a light on the complex and sad realities of domestic abuse.


There are dark parts, for sure.


And then really strange comic scenes that don’t seem to fit.


And then just a lot of situations that don’t make sense if it’s the first time you’re learning about how our minds process and pattern meaning, emotions, and beliefs.



Personally, I thought the series was incredibly powerful and eye-opening.


I would recommend for everyone to watch it (which is actually one of the reasons I'm including it in this blog post).

But I'm a Change Leadership expert not a TV critic, so I’m not going to give you a commentary on the TV show or social justice. Instead I want to just talk about one scene that I think, to many people, would not have made a jot of sense, but to me was one of the most brilliant examples of why change so often fails in organisations.


The weirdest scene


It was the scene where main character Alex goes into the shelter's fake thrift shop, where the clothes have tags with no prices, and a cash register with no cash. Nothing has to be paid for - yet the store is staged as though it does.


Now, for anyone who's come along to one of my popular change leadership webinars, courses, or workshops, you’ll know I put a lot of stock in live demos and practice (what you might call "immersion").


The shelter staff explain - the fake shop is simulated so that it feels as real as possible, to make it feel normal.


And… to start giving these women their sense of control and identity back.


Choosing and paying for your own clothes is an example of empowerment, one that has both a practical and a psychological benefit.


The shelter staff could have simply given these women money and told them to go to a regular store and buy clothes.


But empowerment and confidence comes from experiencing something yourself in your own way, not just being told about it or told to do it.




And it reminded me so much of the resistance we get from stakeholders and teams during change - so often it’s not about the change, it’s about the perception of the loss of power.


Because usually we tell them what's changing and what to do, instead of empowering them to experience it for themselves and find their own paths there.


Which is why live demos and practice, simulations, and immersion are so powerful when leading change.

I’ve used them myself, and seen them be used, with huge success and impact.


Telling someone to do something and inspiring them through experience and empowerment are two very different things.


But why? What IS the difference?


Telling involves the mind.


It's logical and rational but stops at the surface and is often short-lived.


In contrast, inspiring with experience and empowerment involves the body, and more importantly, the heart.


It's emotional, powerful, and deep. It creates decisions, decisions that last.


When our hearts get engaged in a change, our feelings light up different neural pathways and new meaning is made.


That newfound positive power and belief grows and spreads.


And when that happens, think then how engaged your stakeholders and teams become around your change.



That's what I live for


The integration of hearts and minds when leading change is what I spend most of my time talking about (feel free to call me a broken record!).


It's what I'm passionate about, and what I truly believe is the missing element in most change efforts today.



Because when we lead with experience and empowerment - we create a positive future for everyone.





Lata Hamilton is a Change Leadership expert and the creator of Leading Successful Change, a 6-week course that will grow your confidence to lead change end-to-end so you can have the influence and impact you want.




For more information on domestic abuse or to get help for yourself or someone you love, visit the White Ribbon Australia website or call 1800RESPECT.